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Sunday, July 17, 2016

Dehydrating Ginger

     I love ginger.  It is so good for so many things from recipes to ailments. Ginger is great in tea (hot or cold), great in recipes (think Chinese dishes or gingerbread cookies) and can help with nausea and other ailments.   It is good to have some on hand always so one way that I do so in our household is to dry the ginger in my dehydrator.  It is super easy to do and makes it where you can have ginger on hand all year long. 


Dehydrating ginger, dried ginger,
Fresh ginger.


      To dehydrate ginger, take fresh ginger and using a vegetable peeler, peel the ginger, then slice into thin slices.  Lay the slices on your dehydrator trays.

Dehydrating ginger, dried ginger,
Fresh ginger all sliced up.



     Turn on your dehydrator to 135 degrees and dehydrate for 4-6 hours.  You can store the dried ginger in a canning jar or you can turn it into ginger powder and store in a baggie.


Dehydrating ginger, dried ginger
Dehydrated ginger.



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Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Dehydrating Leeks

       During the winter time, I love making huge pots of leek and potato soup but it is hard to find leeks readily available during the winter months.  I prepare for this by growing our own leeks and dehydrating them in the summer time.  I try to dehydrate enough to last all year long.

       Leeks have a mild onion-like taste to them and compliment a lot of different dishes.  I mainly use them in soups, stews, and casseroles.  You can use them in place of an onion in any recipe you see fit.  They dehydrate easily and can be rehydrated quite easily.

dehydrating vegetables, dehydrating leeks, what do leeks taste like, how to use leeks

 
       To dehydrate a leek, first cut off the ends of the leeks, including the green ends.  Wash well.   Slice the leeks about 1/8"-1/4" thick.  Once they are all cut up, run the slices under water or soak for about 5 minutes.  You soak them to get all the dirt off of them.  Lay the leek pieces on your dehydrator tray and dehydrate at 125 degrees for about 8-10 hours.  I generally just turn on my dehydrator before I go to bed and they are ready the next morning. 

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I shared this blog post on the following blogs:
The Chicken Chick 
Strangers & Pilgrims on Earth 
Cornerstone Confessions

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Dehydrating Pineapple

  


     We love dehydrated pineapple at our house.  Unlike store bought dried pineapple, when you make it at home from fresh pineapple is so much more flavorful.  Also, when you make it at home you know what you are getting...dried delicious fruit.  Store bought has added sugar and preservatives...yuck!

     I used to "can" everything but once I discovered dehydrating, I can a lot less often and dehydrate more and more.  Dehydrating takes less time; is not as complicated; and the items take up a fraction of the room.  Food lasts a long time this way and is really yummy too.

       The very first thing you need to do is slice the top off of your pineapple(s).  Now, cut off the sides of the pineapple.





   Don't worry about the little brown "eyes" or the rest.  Once all the sides are cut off, just carefully cut them out.  I do not use a "pineapple cutter" or anything fancy.  I use a regular cutting board and one of my kitchen knives.  They do a fantastic job with minimal pineapple flesh waste.

         Once the top and sides are removed, I cut off the bottom of the pineapple.  Now you can start slicing the pineapple up.  Be sure to cut out the center part of the pineapple.  It is almost like the core of an apple except on a pineapple, the center has a woody type center and is not very tasty so we throw this part out.

      Once I have all the slices, I generally cut it up into small chunks.  Then lie all the pieces onto your dehydrator trays.



     Place all the trays in the dehydrator and set it for 135 degrees and start it.  It takes about 12 hours for the fruit to be ready.  It is so good and makes a great treat.  Kids and adults all love them because they are almost like candy.  We also throw it into trail mix; our morning cereal or oatmeal; or even into baked desserts.



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I shared this blog post on the following blogs:
The Chicken Chick 
Strangers & Pilgrims on Earth 
Cornerstone Confessions

      

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Dehydrating Kiwis

      Dehydrating is a great way to preserve the harvest.  When you dehydrate foods, they shrink down in size and you can store a lot more in a very small amount of space.  Dehydrating preserves the vitamin content and allows items to last for a long time too.  You can rehydrate them and use them as you would any fresh kiwi.  Toss dehydrated kiwis into trail mix, oatmeal or just eat them as a healthy snack.  Or you can soak the kiwi in boiling water for about 15 minutes and then add them to cakes or other desserts.  Also, did you know that Kiwis have more Vitamin C than even an orange?!  Healthy and delicious!

how to dehydrate kiwis, dried kiwi,




    To dehydrate the kiwi, just take & peel each kiwi.  Slice thin and lay out on the dehydrator trays.

how to dehydrate kiwis, dried kiwi,
Sliced kiwi...I use a mandolin to slice them.


     Turn on your dehydrator to 145 degrees and let it run for about 4-6 hours.  The kiwis are done and ready to store when they are bendable and a bit chewy.  Store in baggies or mason jars like we do.

how to dehydrate kiwis, dried kiwi,
The dehydrated kiwi.






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Sunday, March 27, 2016

Happy Easter

   Happy Easter everyone and I hope your day is blessed.

Happy Easter


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Thursday, February 18, 2016

Baby Goat...

   Today at noon, Contessa gave birth to a female and we named her "Carrie Ann".  Contessa was our 2nd goat we got on our homestead.  We got her when she was just 3 weeks old and had rescued her for a large nearby dairy barn.  One of their turkeys had pecked out her eye and with them having so many goats to care for, they couldn't care for her.  We took her (nearly 2 years ago) and have raised her and loved her ever since.  She is half Saanen and half nubian.  Her mate is Casper and he was our first goat here. We purchased him from that same dairy goat farm about 2 weeks prior to taking in Contessa when he was just 3 weeks old too.  Loved bottle feeding the two of them.  Casper is a full blooded Saanen.  Anyway, we bred the two of them together and today baby Carrie Ann was born and we are thrilled.

baby goats, Saanen goats, farm life,
Casper as a baby.
baby goats, Saanen goats, farm life,
Casper & Contessa eating their lunch as babies.

baby goats, Saanen goats, farm life,
Contessa as a baby...notice her injured eye.


A photo posted by Melody Gravitt (@countrifiedhicks) on
  Casper now...


Contessa, 6 months ago.

    Now that you've become reacquainted with Contessa & Casper, meet Carrie Ann.

baby goats, Saanen goats, farm life,

baby goats, Saanen goats, farm life,

baby goats, Saanen goats, farm life,
video

Hope you enjoyed this and I'll share pics as she grows.  This was Contessa's first birthing and she did great and didn't require any assistance.  So proud!  :-)

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Monday, February 15, 2016

Dehydrating Collard Greens

   My family isn't much on eating collard greens but we do grow it for our animals. Even though we do not care for the taste, I like the nutrient value of collard greens and like to implement them into our diet.  I do so by dehydrating the greens and using them in green powder.  I then "sneak" it into our meals without changing taste or texture of our foods.  Green powder can be added a teaspoonful or so at a time to eggs, salads, casseroles, meatloaf, smoothies, etc.

      Collard greens are really packed with healthy vitamins and minerals.  Just one serving of collard greens contain more than your daily requirement of Vitamins K & A.  They also contain a lot of Vitamin C, calcium and iron.  Collards have a lot of protein and posses several anticancer properties and are a great source of fiber...all great reasons to incorporate them into your diet. 

     The first thing you do is take and wash your collard greens real well and then lay them out on your dehydrator tray.

Dehydrating collard greens, how to use dried collard greens, green powder


      Next, turn on your dehydrator.  They dry really fast so generally, within about 3 hours they are completely dry.  When done, they will be super brittle.

Dehydrating collard greens, how to use dried collard greens, green powder




  
     I crumble the leaves into my blender and pulse them until they are a fine powder.  I then add them into my green powder jar until I am ready to use them.

Dehydrating collard greens, how to use dried collard greens, green powder



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I shared this post on the following blogs:
Blog Oklahoma
Blog Oklahoma
easy recipes