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Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Quail Eggs

    I recently won some quail eggs from a page on Facebook (Honeyfield Urban Homestead).  They came in the mail on Monday and it was the perfect opportunity to try out the Mini Eco incubator by Brinsea.  I will update this post and let you know how they turn out.  So excited!

mini eco incubator, brinsea, hatching quail eggs, Coturnix, Japanese quail
I love the little carton she mailed the eggs in.  Quail eggs are so beautifully marked.


mini eco incubator, brinsea, hatching quail eggs, Coturnix quail, Japanese quail
The quail eggs in my incubator.  The "x" and "o" are marked on them so I can be sure to turn them properly.
   These are Coturnix Quail eggs or sometimes known as Japanese Quail.  What I love about quail is that they mature really quickly.   The quail themselves are able to lay fertile eggs at the age of 10 weeks.  Yes, 10 weeks!  Amazing, huh?
     Even though the eggs are so tiny, they are still great little eggs to eat.  It takes several of these eggs to equal one chicken egg when it comes to eating but quail eggs are a lot better nutritionally than a chicken egg. In fact one quail egg has 4 times the nutritional value of one chicken egg.  So, if you have to eat 4 quail eggs to equal one chicken egg, you get a lot more protein because one quail egg has 13% protein and one chicken egg only has 11% protein.  Factor in that a quail egg has 3 times the amount of B1 and 5 times the amount of iron and potassium and that they are actually rich in calcium too, you can see why quail would be a natural choice for a homestead, especially preppers.  They are small, nutritionally rich and could be considered the "rabbit" of the bird world.



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4 comments:

  1. Hi, We have raised many coturnix quail and they are good eating...they will begin laying at around 6 weeks and are prolific layers, they are prone to coccidiosis so be watchful you can lose many in one day(ask me how I know) lol...anyway it is easily treated...This is an entry on my blog that shows the difference in male and female...you can click the picture to make it larger

    http://www.rockyoakhomestead.com/2013/06/this-is-for-birdsand-more.html

    Quail are so much fun...Enjoy and good luck

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much. How do you treat coccidiosis in your birds?

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  2. Hi! I recently went to a place where I get my local eggs in the winter and she tried to sell me quail eggs and said I should eat them raw. I wanted to gag and passed, but I may have to check them out :o) Found you on the bloggy moms FB Hop!

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    Replies
    1. Susan, well I wouldn't eat them raw but I sure will eat them cooked. :-)

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